mod
Learn how to use the mod (%) operator to obtain a remainder in Notion formulas.
The remainder (%) operator allows you to get the remainder after dividing the first operand with the second operand.
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number % number
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mod(number, number)
Notion provides a mod() function as well as % and modoperators (I'll just reference % for the rest of this article).
Somewhat confusingly, these do not return a true modulus value; they return a remainder (see: Remainder or Modulus? below).
As % and mod() output a remainder, their output values will take the sign (+/-) of the dividend.
For reference, the dividend is the number being divided by the divisor, which produces the quotient:
dividenddivisor=quotient\frac {dividend}{divisor} = quotient

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19 % 12 // Output: 7
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​
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19 mod 12 // Output: 7
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​
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mod(-19,12) // Output: -7

If the divisor is negative:
  • mod() will treat it as a negative integer natively.
  • if you're using the % operator, you'll need to wrap your divisor in parentheses () in order to explicitly define your divisor as a negative integer.
    • x % (-y) will work exactly like mod().
    • x % -y will cause Notion to rewrite your formula as x / 100 - y, which will output an incorrect result. This is because the - is treated as a unaryMinus operator, and Notion's math engine can't correctly deal with it when it's appended to the divisor.
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19 % (-12) // Output: 7
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​
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// Negative value passed via a property does not need to
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// be wrapped in () symbols
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​
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prop("negative num") == -12
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19 % prop("negative num") // Output: 7
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​
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19 % -12 // Rewritten as 19 / 100 - 12, outputs -11.81
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​
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mod(19,-12) // Output: 7
Note: The above rules only apply if you're hard-coding a negative divisor in a formula. If you pass one via a property, it'll be parsed as a true negative value. It won't add a unaryMinus operator to your formula.

​Just as in JavaScript, Notion’s % operator calculates the remainder of two numbers, not the modulus. Confusingly, the mod() function does this as well, despite its name.
The remainder and modulus of two numbers will be identical when both the dividend and divisor have the same sign (+/-). If their signs differ, however, the modulus will differ from the remainder.
Mod and Remainder are not the Same
Big Machine
Remainder operator vs. modulo operator (with JavaScript code)
You can prove this using WolframAlpha:
  • -19 mod 12 results in 5
  • QuotientRemainder[-19,12] results in -7
To calculate a true modulus in Notion, use ((x % y) + y) % y instead:
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// Using the % operator
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((19 % 12) + 12) % 12
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​
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// Using the mod() formula
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mod(mod(19, 12) + 12, 12)
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​
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// % operator example using hard-coded negative divisors
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((19 % (-12)) + (-12)) % (-12)
As noted above in the Negative Divisors section, hard-coded negative divisors in % expressions need to be wrapped in parentheses () so Notion can parse them explicitly as negative integers (see code line 7 in the above code block).
Otherwise, Notion will interpret the - as a unaryMinus operator, rewrite your formula to (x / 100 - y + -y) / 100 - y, and return an incorrect result. However, this isn't necessary when using the mod() function.
Remainder vs. Modulo programming functions

This example database shows the differing outputs of remainder and true modulus expressions.

mod
College Info Geek on Notion
You can check these results here:
Modulo Calculator
CalculatorSoup

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prop("Dividend") % prop("Divisor")

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(prop("Dividend") % prop("Divisor") + prop("Divisor")) % prop("Divisor")
Instead of using hard-coded numbers, I’ve called in each property using the prop() function.

​
My name is Thomas Frank, and I'm a Notion-certified writer, YouTuber, and template creator. I've been using Notion since 2018 to organize my personal life and to run my business and YouTube channel. In addition to this formula reference, I've created a free Notion course for beginners and several productivity-focused Notion templates. If you'd like to connect, follow me on Twitter.
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Example Formulas
Negative Divisors
Remainder or Modulus?
Example Database
View and Duplicate Database
"Remainder" Property Formula
"Modulus" Property Formula